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Abstraction: Aspects of Contemporary Art

May 25-August 4, 2019

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In recent years, there has been a resurgence of abstraction. Abstract art, which first emerged as an avant-garde style in the early 20th century, and American abstract art, which was championed by postwar art critics, served as important precedents and key movements in art history. Today, abstraction is once again a subject of interest in the West.

The so-called "death" of painting around 1970 was later followed by the birth of a new type of painting, and in the '80s, artistic practice was liberated from a progressive view of history, leading to a more flexible relationship with artistic heritage. Since the '80s, abstract art has not only referred to existing abstract works but also a wide range of concepts and techniques from the past. This has created something that is more versatile, varied, and expansive. It has also dispensed with the absolute quality of early abstraction, and as modernist dogma has now been surmounted, it has given rise to a new abstract art.

This exhibition focuses on American and European abstract art from the last approximately 40 years, beginning in the '80s. It presents a host of unique and attractive works, including both paintings and sculptures, and also encompasses works by historically important artists whose careers predate the '80s.

Artists
Ellsworth Kelly (1923-2015)
Raoul De Keyser (1930-2012)
Daan Van Golden (1936-2017)
Franz West (1947-2012)
John Armleder(1948-)
Günther Förg (1952-2013)
Michael Krebber (1954-)
Christopher Wool (1955-)
Heimo Zobernig (1958-)
Ugo Rondinone (1964-)
Tomma Abts (1967-)
Sterling Ruby (1972-)
Richard Aldrich (1975-)

  • Organized by The National Museum of Art, Osaka
  • Sponsored by Daikin Foundation for Contemporary Arts

Works

| 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 |

Ellsworth Kelly, Black Diagonal Relief, 2010,
Estate of Ellsworth Kelly,
© Ellsworth Kelly Foundation, courtesy Matthew Marks Gallery

Raoul De Keyser, Spook, 2007,
Private collection,
© Raoul De Keyser, courtesy Wako Works of Art

Daan Van Golden, Heerenlux I, 1993,
Kröller-Müller Museum, Otterlo, The Netherlands,
purchased with support of the Board of Fine Arts and Architecture of the Ministry of Culture

Franz West, Untitled, 2011,
Estate Franz West, Vienna, © Archiv Franz West,
© Estate Franz West

John Armleder, Tablespoon, 2016,
Courtesy of the Artist and Almine Rech,
© John Armleder, photo: Annik Wetter

Günther Förg, Untitled, 1999,
Estate Günther Förg, Suisse,
courtesy Hauser & Wirth and Almine Rech

Michael Krebber,
MK/M2014/15, MK/M2014/19, MK/M2014/10, MK/M2014/12, MK/M2014/05, MK/M2014/17 (detail), 2014,
Collection of Jennifer and David Millstone, courtesy Galerie Buchholz, Berlin/Cologne/New York

Christopher Wool, Untitled, 2014, © Christopher Wool

Heimo Zobernig, Untitled, 2010

Ugo Rondinone, zweiundzwanzigsterjunizweitausendundvierzehn, 2015,
Ishikawa Foundation, Okayama,
© Ugo Rondinone

Tomma Abts, Tewes, 2010,
Collection of Igor DaCosta,
courtesy the Artist; greengrassi, London, photo: Marcus Leith

Sterling Ruby, ACTS/SPLITTTTTTING, 2018,
© Sterling Ruby, courtesy Taka Ishii Gallery,
photo by Robert Wedemeyer

Richard Aldrich, Inanna, 2016,
Courtesy of the artist and MISAKO & ROSEN,
© Rik Vannevel

Admission

Opening Hours

10:00-17:00 (last admission 16:30), Fri. and Sat. until 20:00 (last admission 19:30); from July to Aug., Fri. and Sat. until 21:00 (last admission 20:30).

Closed

Mondays (except July 15) and July 16.

Admission Fee

Adults: 900 (600) yen / University students: 500 (250) yen
*( )admission for groups of more than 20 people.
* Admission free for visitors under 18 years old and mentally or physically disabled people with one attendant.

Night discount (applicable after 17:00 on Fri. and Sat.)
Adults: 700 yen / University students: 400 yen.

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