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2018

The Myriad Forms of Visual Art: 196 Works with 19 Themes

May 26–July 1, 2018


This large-scale exhibition sets out to reexamine contemporary art through the museum collection. Based on 19 groups of works designed to shed light on art through themes such as color, light, nature, animals, and chance, the exhibition will reconfirm various directions in creative expression while providing insight into the future of the visual arts.

Kodai Nakahara, Lego, 1990-91, The National Museum of Art, Osaka

Masterpieces of French Landscape Paintings from The Pushkin State Museum of Fine Arts, Moscow

July 21–October 14, 2018


Since the emergence of landscape painting, artists have painted pictures in a variety of different places. This exhibition is made up of countless depictions of landscapes dating from the 17th to the 20th century. Among the most brilliant pieces in this collection of 65 works from the Pushkin State Museum of Fine Arts in Moscow is Claude Monet’s Luncheon on the Grass, painted just before the dawn of Impressionism.

Claude Monet,
Luncheon on the Grass, 1866,
The Pushkin State Museum of Fine Arts, Moscow
© The Pushkin State Museum of Fine Arts, Moscow.

New Wave: Japanese Contemporary Art of the 1980s

November 3, 2018–January 20, 2019


The ’80s were a major turning point for contemporary art in Japan. The decade saw the rise of a younger generation of artists who favored new types of expression that were sensuous and personal in contrast to the problematic and conceptual art of the previous era. This exhibition reexamines the achievements of the ’80s through a wide range of works, and reproduces various aspects of the era, in which traditional notions of art underwent a huge transformation.

Manabu Nakanishi,
The Guitar Man, 1984,
Collection of the Artist
Photo: Shigeru Jufuku
Courtesy of The Museum of Modern Art, Shiga

Christian Boltanski (tentative title)

February 9–May 6, 2019


In this retrospective, we look back at the work of Christian Boltanski, one of France’s preeminent artists, who has been dealing with themes such as history, memory, death, and absence since the late ’60s. While focusing on the artist’s activities over the last half century, the entire exhibition will also function as an installation that can be viewed as a single work of art.

Christian Boltanski, Monument, 1986, Collection of the Artist